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I'm currently following the CS50 course online and I have installed the appliance. I have managed to change the keyboard to azerty (which I use) and changed the layout to Belgian (you'll never guess what country I'm from). But still I can't type the @ or any "special" characters like curly braces ( {} ) This is really annoying while coding because I always have to copy/paste to insert these.

Can anyone help me out?

  • how does it work for the german keyboard on the new macbook pro? i tried it with alt+8/9 but it does not work... thank you for helping – user1638 Jul 2 '14 at 13:49
  • Please don't ask a new question by posting an answer. You may consider starting your own thread to get better responses. – curiouskiwi Jul 6 '14 at 1:25
  • This does not really answer the question. If you have a different question, you can ask it by clicking Ask Question. You can also add a bounty to draw more attention to this question once you have enough reputation. – curiouskiwi Jul 6 '14 at 1:25
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Well, I sure do have an answer that complies to keyboards of the type shown in the image, if your's is similar, read forward.

Belgian AZERTY Layout

OR

Belgian AZERTY Layout(under Linux)

The Belgian AZERTY keyboard allows for the placing of accents on vowels without recourse to encoding via the Alt key + code. This is made possible by the provision of dead keys for each type of accent: ^ ¨ ´ ` (the last two being generated by a combination of Alt Gr + ù and µ respectively).

To recap the list of different keys from left to right and from top to bottom:

  • First row (symbols and numbers):
    • By combining the shift and ² keys, ³ is obtained;
    • The symbol |, is generated by a combination of Alt Gr + & same key as the 1;
    • The @ symbol is generated by a combination of Alt Gr + é same key as the 2;
    • Unlike the French layout, the ' (or 4) key does not contain a third symbol;
    • Unlike the French layout, the ( (or 5) key does not contain a third symbol;
    • The ^ symbol is generated by a combination of Alt Gr + § same key as the 6 ; but, as opposed to the ^ symbol found to the right of the p key, it is not a dead key, and therefore does not generate the placing of a circumflex accent;
    • Unlike the French layout, the è (or 7) key does not contain a third symbol;
    • Unlike the French layout, the ! (or 8) key does not contain a third symbol;
    • The { symbol is obtained by a combination of Alt Gr + ç same key as the 9;
    • The } symbol is obtained by a combination of Alt Gr + à same key as the 0;
    • Unlike the French layout, the ) (or °) key does not contain a third symbol;
    • The key to the right of the ) key contains the following symbols: - _ with shift and, unlike the French layout, does not contain a third symbol.
  • Second row (the letters AZERTYuiop):
    • the alphabetical keys do not have Alt Gr codes apart from the e, which generates the euro symbol, ;
    • The [ symbol is obtained by a combination of Alt Gr + ^ same key as the ¨ (a partially dead key located to the right of the p key);
    • the key to the right of the ^ key contains the following symbols: $ * with shift and ] with Alt Gr;
  • Third row (the letters qsdfghjklm)
    • the key to the right of m contains the following symbols: ù % with shift and the partially dead key ´ with Alt Gr, which allows acute accents to be generated on accented vowels;
    • the key to the right of ù contains the following symbols: µ £ with shift and the partially dead key ` with Alt Gr, which allows grave accents to be generated on accented vowels;
  • Fourth row (the letters wxcvbn and basic punctuation):
    • The \ symbol is generated by a combination of Alt Gr + <;
    • the key to the right of : contains the following symbols: = + with shift and the partially dead key ~ with Alt Gr, the latter either generating the tilde symbol when combined with the space bar, or positioning a tilde over a letter: a → ã, A → Ã, n → ñ, N → Ñ, o → õ, O → Õ.

Hope this helps, and best of luck with the rest of the course.

Source: AZERTY keyboards

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  • 1
    Woaw nib ty , the second keyboard picture seems to represents what i don't see – Brecht Jun 9 '14 at 11:35
  • No need to thank me, I just remembered working on a AZERTY keyboard for a school project and had to refer the wiki page myself, so remebered that link, so you can thank Wikipedia for that :D – Nib Jun 11 '14 at 7:21
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I found an old post on the web that suggested that in Linux, you use the alt-gr key + the actual key, so that to get the @ you would use alt-gr + the 2/é key. Maybe that is the answer?

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