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I tried to look for the hacker version because I would love to see if I am able to figure out those problem sets, however, I can't seem to locate them.

In the video, it said that the hacker version would be listed on the syllabus, but I don't see it anywhere.

Is this only for people attending the course on campus?

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No, the hacker edition is available for everyone doing the course, though, those of us taking it through edx cannot submit the work done under the Hacker Edition for credit, we still can do it.

If your'e doing the edx one, under the courseware head, in the right bar, there are several weeks shown, just click any one of those weeks, and you'll see a section saying Problem Set 1(or whatever week your'e in) just like in the image below-

Pset1 section

And click Problem set 1 will show you a change in the main column where you'll be shown what looks like this -

problem set1 hacker

Now you can clearly see a Hacker Edition(optional) section under which are 2 heads, Specification's and HTML, clicking the HTML link would lead you to a webpage at cloud front.net, that is your desired link and here you'll find everything related to and about Hacker edition of the pset.

Happy Coding!

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  • Got it ... I think I have spot blindness... ;-)
    – Jonobugs
    Jun 20 '14 at 1:37
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The Hacker version is listed on the same page as the Standard version.

For example, for Problem Set 1:

Courseware Page for problem set 1

Notice there are 2 headings, Standard and Hacker, and an HTML link for each.

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  • Also keep in mind if you're doing the course through edx, that you will not be able to submit hacker set solutions, so you will still have to do standard sets if you're working towards a certificate. Jun 19 '14 at 6:30
  • Thanks, I've always glanced at that page, never read it. Then, I would quickly click the top link. Although it's always nice to get feedback, I'm doing this to learn about programming, so I want to try everything.
    – Jonobugs
    Jun 20 '14 at 1:39

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