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From this article: One of the attributes of an open file is its file position that keeps track of where in the file the next character is to be read or written. On GNU systems, and all POSIX.1 systems, the file position is simply an integer representing the number of bytes from the beginning of the file. The file position is normally set to the beginning of ...


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Actually, it's not really anything to do with the code you've typed in. Its the clang compiler complaining. The breakout.c program would also suffer the same fate if clang was not told to suppress the error in the Makefile definition file. For breakout it contains the following option: -Wno-unused-variable -W is the command line option relating to a ...


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Two small problems with significant impact. First, the code calculates the output padding before calculating the output file width. This is disrupting the size of the output padding and two header values. Second, when vertically scaling, the code outputs the current line as many times as necessary, but each time it does, it also skips forward over padding ...


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In addition to the points made by @MARS and @NullityNull, there are advantages and disadvantages to both methods. Allocating memory on the stack is more convenient because it automatically cleans up after itself when the variable is no longer in scope. Sometimes this is called "garbage collection". However, this convenience comes at a cost of fixed size: ...


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The answer lies in how the file was opened. When opening a file with fopen (which must have been called earlier in the file), you can pass a parameter as the mode to open the file in. Some of these parameters include: "r", to read; "w", to write; and "a", to append. If you opened a file in read mode, you could not write to the ...


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According to SPL's documentation about GTextField GTextField GTextField(int nChars); Creates a text field capable of holding nChars characters. Assigning an action command to the text field causes it to generate an action event whenever the user types the ENTER key. Usage: field = newGTextField(nChars); typedef GInteractor ...


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int sigma(int m) { if (m <= 0) return 0; else return (m + sigma(m - 1)); } The last line is where "magic" happens, because sigma calls itself with m decremented by one each time, each call is getting closer and closer to our base case of m = 0. When m = 0, our function will reverse, instead of adding to the stack, it will ...


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A recursive function typically consists of two main steps base case step recursive step A recursive function basically keeps calling itself until the base case is reached. In the first example above, the base case is m <= 0. It appears from the recursive call (i.e., sigma(m - 1)) that the argument of the function sigma is decreased by 1 which means that ...


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It's very readable as it is, with little inefficiency. The only things that I can think of doing would be to delete the temp vars original(color) and use the array vars directly. That would eliminate 3 assignments. The improvement in efficiency would be trivial though. Next, each if/else sequence could be replaced by using the ternary operator. For example: ...


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You seem to be missing a concept. Each jpg will be made up of multiple blocks of 512B. Your goal is to read from the rawfile until you find a signature block. Once you do, if you already have found a jpg, close that one, open a new one, and then write that 512B to the jpg. Then, keep reading/writing until you find the next signature block. Close the jpg,...


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The biggest problem here is that the code is trying to test for a signature before actually reading in the data from the input file. It's doing a "Ready, Fire, Aim." Order of actions is important here. There are other issues, but you should have a chance to work on them first. If you have additional questions on new problems, please open a new ...


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This is the problem. You read one char from the cardfile, but this char is never processed as part of the bytes. Basically, you just drop these chars. while((c = fgetc(cardfile)) != EOF) {


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Printing out the address of a variable "%x" does indeed require that the variable you are trying to print is an unsigned int, but &var1 and &var2 are both pointers (int* and char (*)[10] respectively). In order to print pointers you must use the "%p" format specifier, so the calls to printf should look like this: printf("...


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Actually, the posted code is not doing many of the things that it should. If tested with rfactor == 1, it works fine, as indicated by :) doesn't resize 1x1-pixel BMP when n is 1. However, when rfactor > 1, it falls apart. Header calculations are incorrect and the image data actually outputs far less data than the image data of the original image file. My ...


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You are always using the subscript 'i'. 'i' has the value 3 when the first loop is finished. You can either change the subscript names in the y loop and the x loop OR just use 'i' again to run those loops.


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