6

The only deadline is 31 Dec 2014 if you are going for a certificate. There are Weeks because you are doing the same course as the "in person" Harvard students who took CS50 on campus, and for them, those were the actual weeks of the term. On the course's edx page, they have a suggested schedule (that updates automatically) to give you some "soft" deadlines ...


2

The binary-through-bulbs-API demonstration was, indeed, intriguing. An entire video seminar, in fact, led by Dan Bradley '14, offers step by step instruction, entitled Light Your World (with Hue Bulbs). As seen in the first week of lecture, Hue bulbs are light bulbs you can control wirelessly. They can do pretty amazing things, if you know how to ...


2

Probably the Philips Hue, but that's only a guess. They aren't cheap though. http://www2.meethue.com/en-us/


2

Typically and according to the standard, the return value of main should be of type int which obviously means that you should return an int value from main. However, you don't really have to do that in C99/C11 as in these standards, if you do not explicitly return an int value from main, the value 0 is returned automatically. From C11 standard: 5.1.2.2....


2

You may refer to the Staff page on the course website: To contact the course's heads, email heads@cs50.harvard.edu. That should cover the range of issues you might want to report. However, if for some reason you feel the need to contact an individual staff member to give feedback or report an error, here are their email addresses from the above site, ...


2

http://cdn.cs50.net/2014/fall/lectures/5/m/notes5m/notes5m.html There are class notes available for every lecture, they are posted under the videos.


2

While it is easy to represent integers in a computer, it is different for floating point numbers. Most FP numbers cannot be precisely represented inside a computer. The reason is because numbers are represented in base 2 in a computer, but most base 10 fractions can't be represented by base 2 systems. For a detailed explanation, you might try googling for ...


2

The 2015 edX course uses the 2014 Fall Harvard lectures. They will not be updated, as the course runs until 31 December 2015. The 2016 edX course will then use the 2015 Fall Harvard lectures. So you can start now.


2

Characters in C Language are in ASCII encoding. For now, you need to know that there is a unique numerical value associated with any* character that you can think of. Lets have a look. I will be using C++ for simply displaying that numerical value by typecasting it to integer. cout<<(int)('a'); //outputs 97 cout<<(int)('b'); ...


2

Characters are represented and stored in the computer using a numeric value called an ASCII value. (ASCII stands for American Standard Code for Information Interchange.) A '0' character is stored in a computer as a character with the numeric decimal value of 48 (or a hexadecimal value of 30). The end of string marker, \0 , is actually stored as all binary ...


2

you can see the following link https://superuser.com/questions/578292/why-do-computers-count-from-zero


2

The error you are getting is not saying that you are passing a double instead of a float, but that a double is expected. You are passing average, which is not a variable but a function. Your prototype declaration for the function (float average (void)) is also throwing an error because it does not match the function, which need has a definition of float ...


1

The problem is the free list command following the temp[3] assignment. It breaks the program. At that point, list contains the address of the reallocated memory. So, that memory is deallocated. The work with tmp that follows is unpredictable at best. Since the address in tmp is assigned to list, list now contains the same address that was freed. In short, ...


1

That code calculates the number of elements in the array book[]. sizeof(book) is the total size of the array, 72 bytes. Next, remembering that this is an array of pointers to strings ( the CS50.h string type is equivalent to a char array and the starting point of that string is an address), sizeof(string) is the size of a pointer, or 8 bytes. Divide 72 by 8 ...


1

The material for each pset is presented in a timely manner and pretty thoroughly. You should do the psets as they are presented. In no case is it necessary to watch material that is presented after a pset to do that pset. Having said that, there are later concepts that will make some of the early stuff easier, but you should master the earlier material ...


1

ultimately, computers use numbers to represent data of any kind (e.g., individual characters, text strings, images, media files, numbers, etc). you might be wondering how can a computer be capable of representing all these different kinds of data with just numbers? how is it able to understand whether a particular numeric value represent something or ...


1

Probably not. I am rewatching them, but I got distracted by real life and other things after a couple of lectures, but if you're farther in I would think it's not necessary. They're always there if you need them while you work through the psets, so I wouldn't take the time if you didn't think you needed them. Good luck!


1

They cover the same material but may be in slightly different order. I'd suggest reading the given notes for each lecture to make sure you still remember what was taught in that lecture. The notes are found underneath the video on the edX courseware page.


1

The current versions (Fall 2015) of the lecture videos are available on youtube at the following link: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhQjrBD2T383Xfn0zECHrOTpfOSlptPAB However I don't know if those match the pset(s), etc. of what's currently available on the edX CS50 site.


1

It is true that x is a pointer, but it is a pointer to a block that can hold a maximum of 10 integer values. Arrays, in C, technically work the same way; an array name's decay to a pointer to the array (the block) and the bracket notation is just a syntactic sugar for some pointer arithmetic that is done underneath the hood. So now that you know that the ...


1

Found zip file at http://cdn.cs50.net/2014/fall/lectures/8/m/ But, please add link to CS50x courseware.


1

I went to the lecture and noticed that wasn't "eight such byte", it was "ith such byte". I think this is clear now. Warning: I don't have captions.


1

I am not sure which video he mentions this (at least, I hope he does) in the new videos, but somewhere in last years videos I caught the answer to this question. Basically, C is smart enough that, should you neglect to return 0 by the end of your main function, it does it for you. So no, you don't need to write the command, but you can if you want the ...


1

It sounds like you're still accessing the old 2014 version of the course. You can access the new lectures as follows. Log into Edx. Enroll in the new offering of the course, CS50x3 Click the View Course button next to CS50x3 in your Dashboard Click the Courseware link on the top navigation bar Click the desired Week on the left navigation bar Click Lecture ...


1

Let your decision be effected by this comparison. edX offers you course for free if you apply for honor code certificate and a threshold donation if you apply for a verified certificate. The lectures on both of these resources are almost same(the syllabus and teaching patterns and etcetera). The only difference might be because of the two semesters as edX ...


1

This type of loops has 3 main parts initialization (e.g., N = 0) the loop continuation condition — the code inside the body of the loop repeats as long as this condition evaluates to true (e.g., N is less than the number of persons in the room). the update — eventually causes the loop continuation condition to evaluate to false so that we don't become stuck ...


1

This year, two problem sets were removed and three were added relative to last year. So it would be reasonable to expect some changes to the problem sets in 2014. However, the lectures themselves don't focus much on the problem sets - instead, they focus on important concepts, which the problem sets are designed to give you practice using, implementing and ...


1

Absolutely correct. If search() is the first operation called then the first node variable will be NULL and the loop will not execute. However, if you inspect the code for insert(), you may see that a value is assigned to the first node. For example, from line 123: // initialize node printf("Number to insert: "); newptr->n = GetInt(); newptr->next = ...


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